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FAQs - Prospective Students

1. Application and Acceptance
What are my options?
How do I get in?
Do I have to be admitted to TAMU to apply?
What majors do you accept?
When will I get a decision?
Are there scholarships for freshmen?
Can I apply later?
Which LLC?


2. Program Requirements
What do I have to do to stay in the University Honors Program?
Do I have to be in Honors to do Undergraduate Research?
Do I have to live in the Honors Housing Community?
Do I have to choose between Lechner and McFadden Halls?
Can I choose my own roommate?
Do I need to do anything for University Honors during my New Student Conference (NSC)?


3. Program Benefits
What does Honors do for me?
What is Howdy Week?
What do students have to say about their experience?



What are my options?
You can customize your Honors experience at Texas A&M through a variety of options for Honors study. In addtion to the University Honors Program, there are a number of college and departmental Honors tracks that students can pursue, each of which can become a graduation distinction. See http://honorsprograms.tamu.edu for more information. Additionally, any student that meets objective standards may register for available seats in Honors sections. You do not have to be in an Honors program to take Honors classes.

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How do I get in?
There is a separate application at http://honors.tamu.edu/haf. The deadline is December 1. Freshmen admitted to the program are required to stay in the Honors Housing Community, so they need to have also completed the on-campus housing application. Notifications are made in March.
 
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Do I have to be admitted to TAMU to apply?
You do not have to be admitted to TAMU to apply to the University Honors Program. You just need to have submitted your Apply Texas application and created a NetID and login to access our online application. There is typically several days lag between the time you submit your Apply Texas application and the assignment of your student ID (UIN), which you will need to create a NetID, so be sure to give yourself plenty of time to complete the application.

You do have to be admitted to TAMU to apply for housing, but there is not a set deadline for the housing application. Depending on the demand each year, housing might fill before or after our December 1 application deadline. If you submitted your application for the University Honors Program before the deadline, it will be considered if you are admitted to TAMU and are able to apply for housing.

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What majors do you accept?
The University Honors Program is open to students from all 300+ different majors. There are additional opportunities for more focused Honors study in specific colleges and majors.
 
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When will I get a decision?
All initial decisions will be made by March 31. Students who are initially wait-listed may receive an acceptance offer in May. Please bear in mind that in order to be offered a spot from the wait list, you must still be in on-campus housing with a preference for the Honors Housing Community.

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Are there scholarships for Honors Students?
There are no 4-year scholarships associated with being in Honors, though many of our students receive these. The University Scholars program is the only scholarship program we coordinate.
 
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Can I apply later?
Yes. If the Honors freshman program does not sound like a good fit, you can apply as a continuing student. To be eligible to apply as a continuing student you must have a 3.5+ cumulative TAMU GPR and be able to complete distinction requirements. We encourage all continuing students who are considering applying to the program to meet with an Honors advisor to help map out their plan for completing distinction requirements since this is the major consideration in selection.

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Which LLC?
You may have several options for participating in a living learning community (LLC) at Texas A&M. We encourage you to carefully consider the focus and benefits that each offers, and choose the one that best fits your own goals.
 
The freshman Honors learning community in McFadden|Lechner Halls is an interdisciplinary program with students from a number of different majors (we typically see about 50% engineering students). The focus in our program is on fostering critical thinking skills, introducing students to research, creating opportunities for networking, and helping students create a plan for their college years and beyond. Participation in this LLC is a requirement first-year students in our program, and requires students to set a preference for the Honors Housing Community when applying for on-campus housing.

No matter which LLC you choose to live in, you’ll benefit from interaction with a small group in a large university setting and special attention to the needs of first-year students. For a list of the LLCs at Texas A&M and a description of their programs, see http://reslife.tamu.edu/livingOnCampus/livingLearning/llcs.

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What do I have to do to stay in the Honors program?
To remain in good standing, University Honors Students must 1) maintain a 3.5 cumulative GPR and a 3.25 in their Honors course work, 2) make progress toward distinction requirements which include completing a capstone experience, 3) meet minimum participation requirements (seminar for freshmen, HSC events for upperclassmen), and 4) maintain an academic portfolio. link
 
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Do I have to be in Honors to do undergraduate research?
No. Any undergraduate can get involved in research. All Honors Students are required to complete a capstone experience which will entail scholarly inquiry of some kind. See http://tx.ag/Capstones for details.
 
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Do I have to live in the Honors Housing Community?
All freshmen in University Honors are required to live in the Honors Housing Community (HHC), composed of two residence halls, Lechner and McFadden. Freshmen benefit from living in HHC by joining a community of like-minded students who study and socialize together, by receiving guidance from Sophomore Advisors (see below), and by having easy access to campus events and traditions. HHC is one of the most beloved parts of our program. Beginning their sophomore year, students are welcome to live in other residence halls or to move off campus.

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Do I have to choose between Lechner and McFadden Halls?
No, the Department of Residence Life will assign you to one of these halls. Lechner and McFadden (colloquially referred to as “LechFadden”) are considered one community, and your student ID card will allow you to enter both.

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Can I choose my own roommate?
No, your roommate in the Honors Housing Community is randomly assigned. We believe that having a “potluck” roommate gives you an opportunity to develop a new connection and to learn how to communicate and cooperate with someone who may be different than you. Most students make lifelong friends in HHC and have little to no trouble adjusting to living with a roommate. If you do encounter any difficulties, your Resident Advisor can provide conflict-resolution resources and can, in extreme circumstances, help you move to a different room.

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Do I need to do anything for University Honors during my New Student Conference (NSC)?
You must register for UGST 181, “Honors Family Meeting,” which is the required first-year seminar for University Honors students. During your NSC, you may visit our drop-in advising hours, 11:30-1:30, on the first floor of Henderson Hall. There are no mandatory events specifically for University Honors students at the NSCs.

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What does Honors do for me?
In general, Honors provides more challenge and enrichment for students seeking more in their undergraduate careers. Benefits include small classes, more contact with professors, an intellectually-stimulating peer group, additional support and advising, and recognition at graduation.
 
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What is Howdy Week?
Howdy Week is a University Honors tradition held the week prior to the beginning of fall semester classes. The Sophomore Advisors plan four or five fun activities every day to help you get acquainted with campus, meet other Honors students, and learn Honors and A&M traditions!

Howdy Week coincides with Texas A&M’s Gig ’Em Week, which features many university-wide events that offer free food and lots of fun and entertainment for all students. This week is a great time to learn your way around campus and get settled in before your academic responsibilities begin. Howdy Week begins with Texas A&M’s official move-in day, two Sundays before fall classes begin. Hundreds of volunteers are available on move-in day to help you unload your car, carry belongings into the hall and upstairs, and loft your bed. We highly encourage you to arrive on campus in time to experience the excitement of Howdy Week!

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What do students have to say about their experience?
Learning Community
“Being in honors classes and living in the honors dorm helped me to find and connect with other students who valued learning the way I did in a way I might otherwise have missed on such a large campus.”

Critical Thinking & Writing-Intensive Courses
“The honors experience gave me a great foundation in critical thinking and writing skills far beyond just the subject-matter knowledge I gained from studying the course material.”

Enhanced Networking/Collaborative Skills
“In hindsight, my Honors experience is something that I utilize on a regular basis in my career and in interactions with people both professionally and personally.”

Critical Thinking & Life-Long Learning
“The honors classes encouraged a deeper understanding via discussion and practical experience. This differentiation in learning styles (I have reached for the honors class approach when learning a topic in my life after school) has allowed me to gain a deeper understanding of anything that I desire to learn about.”

Undergraduate Research
“Doing undergraduate research provided me the experience of really doing science. I was able to observe and participate in all aspects of scientific research, including writing proposals, designing experiments, writing and publishing results. The experience prepared me for graduate studies and for my career as an academic researcher.”

“I pursued research at the graduate level because of my positive experience in the Research Fellows program. I currently find myself providing support for a developing Honors program for college students because I know participation in such a program can be a defining experience in a student’s intellectual and personal maturation.”

Common Intellectual Experience
“I value the fact that I had the opportunity to take Honors engineering courses as well as sociology courses that were entirely outside my major.”

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